352nd SOMXS enables global SOF support

U.S. Airmen from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron inspect a CV-22 refueling probe for leaks, cracks and deterioration prior to launch Jan. 17. 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. From pre-flight inspections to phase maintenance, 352 SOMXS personnel inspect these tiltrotor aircraft multiple times annually in support of an active, long-range special operations role. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

U.S. Airmen from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron inspect a CV-22 refueling probe for leaks, cracks and deterioration prior to launch Jan. 17. 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. From pre-flight inspections to phase maintenance, 352 SOMXS personnel inspect these tiltrotor aircraft multiple times annually in support of an active, long-range special operations role. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

U.S. Airmen from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron prepare to launch CV-22 Ospreys in the early morning Jan. 17, 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. From inspection to launch, maintenance Airmen from five career fields work night and day to ensure the CV-22 is prepared to deliver its one-of-a-kind combination of speed, range and operational flexibility for special operations missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

U.S. Airmen from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron prepare to launch CV-22 Ospreys in the early morning Jan. 17, 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. From inspection to launch, maintenance Airmen from five career fields work night and day to ensure the CV-22 is prepared to deliver its one-of-a-kind combination of speed, range and operational flexibility for special operations missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

Crew chiefs from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron communicate with an aircrew from the 7th Special Operations Squadron as they prepare to startup a CV-22 Osprey Jan. 17, 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. Maintenance personnel and aircrew work closely together before and after every flight to keep the CV-22 capable of bringing a combination of speed and vertical-lift capability not met by any other existing fixed-or rotary-wing platform. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

Crew chiefs from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron communicate with an aircrew from the 7th Special Operations Squadron as they prepare to startup a CV-22 Osprey Jan. 17, 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. Maintenance personnel and aircrew work closely together before and after every flight to keep the CV-22 capable of bringing a combination of speed and vertical-lift capability not met by any other existing fixed-or rotary-wing platform. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

A CV-22 Osprey, assigned to the 352d Special Operations Wing taxis past Airmen from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron prior to takeoff Jan. 17, 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. From the flightline to the cockpit, a combination of dedicated Airmen keep these CV-22s capable of supporting global special operations forces at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

A CV-22 Osprey, assigned to the 352d Special Operations Wing taxis past Airmen from the 352d Special Operations Maintenance Squadron prior to takeoff Jan. 17, 2017 on RAF Mildenhall, England. From the flightline to the cockpit, a combination of dedicated Airmen keep these CV-22s capable of supporting global special operations forces at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt Chris Sullivan)

RAF Mildenhall --

Dawn breaks over Airmen of the 352nd Special Operations Maintenance Squadron readying to launch CV-22 Ospreys Jan. 17, 2017, at RAF Mildenhall, England.

These maintainers represent five career fields working night and day to ensure the CV-22 is prepared to deliver its one-of-a-kind combination of speed, range and operational flexibility for special operations missions.

Maintenance personnel and aircrew work closely together before and after every flight to keep their Osprey fleet capable of bringing a combination of speed and vertical-lift capability not met by any other existing fixed-or rotary-wing platform.