Fuels Airmen, flight crews practice night Forward Area Refueling Point procedures

Airmen assigned to the 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron conduct a hot refuel on a U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. FARP first came about after the 1980 Iran hostage rescue attempt. After this event, the Air Force realized the need for a highly-efficient way to transfer fuel from one aircraft to another, in non-standard and hostile environments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

Airmen assigned to the 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron conduct a hot refuel on a U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. FARP first came about after the 1980 Iran hostage rescue attempt. After this event, the Air Force realized the need for a highly-efficient way to transfer fuel from one aircraft to another, in non-standard and hostile environments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

An Airman assigned 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron marshals an MC-130 Talon II preparing to refuel a U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. Special teams of fuels Airmen provide a critical capability for wartime and humanitarian missions as FARP operations expand the role of special operation forces around the world. They provide a means of "hot" refueling from a tanker aircraft to various types of fixed and rotor-wing receiver aircraft.
 (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

An Airman assigned 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron marshals an MC-130 Talon II preparing to refuel a U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. Special teams of fuels Airmen provide a critical capability for wartime and humanitarian missions as FARP operations expand the role of special operation forces around the world. They provide a means of "hot" refueling from a tanker aircraft to various types of fixed and rotor-wing receiver aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

Airmen assigned to the 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron conduct a hot refuel of a   U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. FARP first came about after the 1980 Iran hostage rescue attempt. After this event, the Air Force realized the need for a highly-efficient way to transfer fuel from one aircraft to another, in non-standard and hostile environments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

Airmen assigned to the 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron conduct a hot refuel of a U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. FARP first came about after the 1980 Iran hostage rescue attempt. After this event, the Air Force realized the need for a highly-efficient way to transfer fuel from one aircraft to another, in non-standard and hostile environments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

Airmen assigned to the 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron prepare to refuel a U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. FARP first came about after the 1980 Iran hostage rescue attempt. After this event, the Air Force realized the need for a highly-efficient way to transfer fuel from one aircraft to another, in non-standard and hostile environments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

Airmen assigned to the 1st Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron prepare to refuel a U-28A during Forward Area Refueling Point training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 7, 2015. FARP first came about after the 1980 Iran hostage rescue attempt. After this event, the Air Force realized the need for a highly-efficient way to transfer fuel from one aircraft to another, in non-standard and hostile environments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Kai L. White)

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. -- Special teams of fuels Airmen provide a critical capability for wartime and humanitarian missions as FARP operations expand the role of special operation forces around the world. They provide a means of "hot" refueling from a tanker aircraft to various types of fixed and rotor-wing receiver aircraft. FARP missions are flown at only five bases around the world: Kadena Air Base, Japan; Royal Air Forces Mildenhall, England; Hurlburt Field Air Force Base, Fla.; Charleston AFB, S.C.; and Cannon AFB, N.M. Between all the bases, there are only 46 total members from the fuels career field, which has about 3,700 personnel, who are part of this special team.