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AFSOC civilian wins PACE Leadership Impact Award

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Danny White, Air Force Special Operations Command A1KE education operations branch chief, won the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence Leadership Impact Award for creating the Civilian Leadership Development Program. The program focuses on purposeful development of civilian leaders within AFSOC through a one-year course. Program content involves coursework, networking, workshops, team building and site visits. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sergeant Lynette M. Rolen)

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Danny White, Air Force Special Operations Command A1KE education operations branch chief (far right), won the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence Leadership Impact Award for creating the Civilian Leadership Development Program. The program includes tours through facilities that support the Air Force mission, such as Lockheed Martin. In addition to tours, the program focuses on multiple facets of civilian leadership development. (Courtesy photo)

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Danny White, Air Force Special Operations Command A1KE education operations branch chief, prepares certificates May 22, 2018, at Hurlburt Field, Fla. White won the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence Leadership Impact Award for creating the Civilian Leadership Development Program. Each course iteration lasts one year and graduates civilian leaders. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sergeant Lynette M. Rolen)

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. --

An Air Force Special Operations Command civilian was awarded the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence Leadership Impact Award, which recognizes exceptional programs and those who create them.

Danny White, AFSOC A1KE (manpower, personnel and services directorate) education operations branch chief, was selected for the award for his work in creating the AFSOC Civilian Leadership Development Program.

The program focuses on purposeful development of AFSOC’s civilian leaders. Civilians are nominated for participation in the annual program. Program content involves coursework, networking, workshops, team building and site visits. As the civilian force expands within the Air Force, emphasis on developing leaders within that force is necessary.   

“Civilians seem to feel more included, and they get a personal view of AFSOC leadership dedicating time to developing them,” said Kyle Ingram, AFSOC A1K deputy chief, personnel support division and White’s supervisor. “Mr. White is currently revamping the program to expand it to additional wings across the enterprise. This expansion speaks volumes to an outstanding program.”

White cited the need for civilian development as his inspiration for developing the program.

 “I think it helps the Air Force as a whole because it has opened AFSOC’s civilian eyes to the Air Force opportunities,” said White. “There are so many programs for civilian development in the Air Force and now our command is providing opportunities and encouraging participation.”

The AFSOC CLDP not only broadens civilians’ mindsets about the command, but it also enlightens them to the different programs across the Air Force.

“Mr. White built an outstanding program for the HQ AFSOC staff,” said Ingram. “He works very hard with it and consistently seeks feedback from participants and others to improve it. I think that’s exemplary.”

Throughout the duration of the CLDP, support from AFSOC leadership is invaluable to the success of the program.

“I felt surprised when I heard I won the award,” said White. “I also realized it wasn’t just me; it was the program, which involved the participants, the directors and leadership. It’s a whole AFSOC team award in my opinion.”