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CARE for Air Commandos; AFSOC POTFF hosts fourth annual resilience summit

A group of people walking on a trail.

Participants of the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit walk the Gatlinburg trail in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24, 2019. This summit marked the first off-site visit in four years for the Preservation of the Force and Family program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

Two people taking a picture while on a hike.

Katie Dean, wife and caregiver of Staff Sgt. Jason Dean (right), 20th Special Operations Squadron special missions aviator, takes a picture of the Gatlinburg trail during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24, 2019. The summit provided AFSOC’s wounded, ill or injured service members and their caregivers with resilience-building events. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

One person smiling during a hike with a river in the background.

Stephanie Ames, wife and caregiver of U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Michael Ames, 720th Operations Support Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of personnel recover, combat development, smiles on a hike at the Gatlinburg trail during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24, 2019. This summit marked the first off-site visit in four years for the Preservation of the Force and Family program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

One person holding their child while sitting at a table.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Phillip Bean, 16th Aircraft Maintenance Unit section chief and caregiver for his wife, holds their son Max during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24, 2019. The CARE summit focused on promoting a whole-family approach to resilience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

Four people talking in a room.

Nancy Wilson (right), wife of Air Force Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Stephen Wilson, speaks to Capt. Jon Bal (left), Air Force Special Operations Command A4 (maintenance directorate) fixed wing sustainment chief and his wife and caregiver, Megan Bal, during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 23, 2019. The summit allows Air Force leadership to interact with AFSOC’s wounded, ill or injured service members and their caregivers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

Three people talking in a resort lobby.

U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Gregory Smith (left), command chief of Air Force Special Operations Command, speaks with Staff Sgt. Nicholas Trumble (right), 25th Intelligence Squadron tactical systems operator, and his wife, Christie Trumble during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education (CARE) summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 22, 2019. The first day of the CARE summit features a meet and greet session where all participants of the summit network with one another. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

One person playing with their child while sitting at a table.

U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Ronald Brandtman, 1st Special Operations Wing Military Personnel Flight commander, plays with his daughter Eleanor during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24, 2019. The CARE summit focused on promoting a whole-family approach to resilience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

A group of people sitting at a conference table in a conference room.

Air Force Special Operations Command’s Air Commando caregivers participate in a group discussion during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education (CARE) summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 23, 2019. The CARE summit brings caregivers of AFSOC’s wounded, ill or injured together to network and share stories. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

Three people talking in a room.

Air Force Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Stephen Wilson (left) speaks to Jessica David (right), spouse and caregiver of Tech. Sgt. Anthony David (back), 16th Special Operations Squadron flight engineer, during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education (CARE) summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 23, 2019. Wilson visited the summit to gauge providing advocacy and support for AFSOC’s wounded, ill or injured service members and their caregivers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

Two people talking to one another in a room.
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Janet Murphy, an Air Commando caregiver, speaks with Lt. Gen. Brad Webb, commander of AFSOC, during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education (CARE) summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 23, 2019. The CARE summit allows AFSOC leadership to listen to concerns or questions caregivers have about resilience and networking. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

One person writing in a book while sitting at a table.
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Jona Barry, wife and caregiver of U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Eric Barry, Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command A3 (operations directorate) pararescueman, takes notes during a presentation at the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education (CARE) summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 25, 2019. The CARE summit provided resilience lessons and classroom-guided instruction for caregivers of AFSOC’s wounded, ill or injured service members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

One person looking at a presentation.
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Frances Lewis, caregiver of U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Monique Wright, 27th Special Operations Wing occupational safety manager, listens to a presentation at the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education (CARE) summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 25, 2019. The CARE summit provided caregivers of AFSOC wounded, ill or injured service members with resilience tools and lessons geared toward restoring full family readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

Three people talking in a room.
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Ron Johnson (right), Airman for Life program manager, speaks with Capt. Jon Bal, Air Force Special Operations Command A4 (maintenance directorate) fixed wing sustainment chief and his wife and caregiver, Megan Bal, during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 23, 2019. The Airman for Life program mission is to honor and empower Air Force Wounded Warrior veterans and their families by creating a social environment that provides specialized assistance, referrals, educates, informs and inspires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

One person holding a program.
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Megan Bal, wife and caregiver of Capt. Jon Bal, Air Force Special Operations Command A4 (maintenance directorate) fixed wing sustainment chief, holds an Airman for Life program pamphlet during the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 23, 2019. The vision of the Airman for Life program is to build a resilient community for Air Force Wounded Warriors’ family by building a network of support. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

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Participants of the 2019 Air Force Special Operations Command Caregiver and Resilience Education (CARE) summit participate in a resource discussion panel at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 23, 2019. The panel provided participants with knowledge about different resilience resources. The CARE summit provides caregivers of AFSOC’s wounded, ill or injured service members with resilience resources. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Rolen)

GATLINBURG, Tenn. --

Air Force Special Operations Command’s Preservation of the Force and Family hosted a caregiver and resilience education (CARE) summit at a resort in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, from April 22-27.

The summit promoted a whole-family approach to resilience and readiness for AFSOC’s wounded, ill or injured service members and their caregivers.

“I’m really proud of the CARE summit efforts,” said Lt. Gen. Brad Webb, commander of AFSOC. “This is focused on the caregivers. For those of you that participate in this, this is a labor of love. When you get to see the difference it makes with the families that are attending these kinds of summits, this is an area where Air Commandos are taking care of Air Commandos and I am particularly proud.”

More than 20 of AFSOC’s Air Commandos and their caregivers attended the summit, receiving numerous resilience resources and networking.

Katie Dean, wife and caregiver of Staff Sgt. Jason Dean, 20th Special Operations Squadron special missions aviator, who was injured in a helicopter crash last year, commented on the summit.

“We love the abundance of resources that are available,” said Katie. “I learned about resources that I hadn’t even heard of before. As Jason moves forward with surgeries, and if he can fly again or if he gets out, I know there’s a lot of resources we can tap into and see what benefits are there and available for us.”

Dean previously tried pain management and physical therapy to recuperate from the crash, with little success.

“Some of my bones were broken in the crash and it injured my back and neck really bad,” said Dean. “Kaye Creasman, AFSOC Wounded Warrior program manager, was one of my case managers as I was seeking treatment. She helped me get into the POTFF program and receive more individualized treatment.”

As Dean continues with a tailored treatment plan, he and Katie learn more about the process and make connections with families in similar situations.

“This summit is super beneficial,” said Dean. “We’ve learned about the groups out there to help us. Then there’s also just the bonding; talking to other guys that are hurt or have some type of illness or something like that. To be able to sit, talk, share and meet new people is great. It’s also great to talk to the other members that are the caregivers.”

At one point during the summit, all the caregivers gathered together in a conference room to share their stories.

“When the caregivers were together, just being able to listen and hear that other people have similar struggles is enlightening,” said Katie. “It’s like, ‘Oh, there’s somebody battling that too!’ We have a great support system at Cannon and of course we talk about our struggles and what we’ve dealt with. It’s just nice to really be able to have someone that can say, ‘I definitely understand where you’re coming from, this happened to me too.’ From a caregiver standpoint, it’s nice to have that other caregiver to lean on and say, ‘Well, my husband went through this and this is how I helped him.’”

The Deans linked up with other caregivers they met at the summit.

“There’s several couples we’ve really gotten close to and we can see ourselves hanging out with them in the future,” said Katie. “We plan on keeping in touch with them. Programs like POTFF are instrumental; there’s so many stresses that are involved with seeking treatment and having that supportive community is a huge help to both personal life, marriage, work and wherever you are.”

Col. Thad Allen, United States Special Operations Command POTFF director, commented on the importance of the program’s focus.

“AFSOC and SOCOM looked at themselves and asked what they needed to do for our families,” said Allen. “I can’t think of anything more important than caregivers. What we need to afford to do is take care of our families. Three times a year, I get the chance to talk to all of the new commanders coming into SOCOM. The one thing they need to know is that families really do help fuel service members and are the foundation for everything that we do and without that foundation, you’re going to fail.”

On a similar note, Air Force Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Stephen Wilson commented on the importance of family readiness.

“If the family’s not ready, it affects everything,” said Wilson. “Gen. Goldfein’s laser-focused on the families. Invisible wounds of war is one area he’s determined that it’s (seeking help) going to be normalized across the Air Force. We look at how we can strengthen that and make sure there’s no stigma and people are seeking out that help, both for members and families. We owe this to them; we ask people to serve and this is what we owe back to our force.”