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AFSOC leadership remember fallen Airmen with Honor Trees

U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Hill, deputy commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, places stars on an Honor Tree

U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Hill, deputy commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, places stars on an Honor Tree at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

U.S. Air Force Col. Timothy Hood, vice commander of the 1st Special Operations Wing, places stars on an Honor Tree.

U.S. Air Force Col. Timothy Hood, vice commander of the 1st Special Operations Wing, places stars on an Honor Tree at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. John Lang, superintendent of the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Group, places stars on an Honor Tree.

U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. John Lang, superintendent of the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Group, places stars on an Honor Tree at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Hill, deputy commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, places stars on an Honor Tree.

U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Hill, deputy commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, places stars on an Honor Tree with Jayne Warner, the spiritual community program peer network coordinator with AFSOC Preservation of the Force and Family, at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Hill, deputy commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, places stars on an Honor Tree.

U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Hill, deputy commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, places stars on an Honor Tree at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command stood up in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

Leadership with HQ AFSOC, 1st Special Operations Wing and 24th SOW, carried on a holiday tradition by placing red, white and blue stars to honor 365 fallen Airmen.

Leadership with Air Force Special Operations Command, 1st Special Operations Wing and 24th SOW, carry on a holiday tradition by placing red, white and blue stars to honor 365 fallen AFSOC Airmen, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

Leadership with HQ AFSOC, 1st Special Operations Wing and 24th SOW, carried on a holiday tradition by placing red, white and blue stars to honor 365 fallen Airmen.

A four-foot tree represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat with 48 gold stars at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. Leadership with HQ AFSOC, 1st Special Operations Wing and 24th SOW, carried on a holiday tradition by placing red, white and blue stars to honor 365 fallen Airmen. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, places a star on an Honor Tree

U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, right, commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, and U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Christopher Grove, left, command chief of the 24th SOW, place stars on an Honor Tree at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, places a star on an Honor Tree

U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, places a star on an Honor Tree at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, places a star on an Honor Tree
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U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, right, commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, and U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Christopher Grove, left, command chief of the 24th SOW, place stars on an Honor Tree at Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, Hurlburt Field, Florida, Dec. 4, 2020. The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman. A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while serving in an AFSOC position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Marleah Cabano)

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. --

Leadership with Headquarters Air Force Special Operations Command, 1st Special Operations Wing and 24th SOW, carried on a holiday tradition by placing red, white and blue stars to honor 365 fallen Airmen, Dec. 4, 2020.

The Honor Trees were created by AFSOC’s Preservation of the Force and Family as a way to remember and honor fallen Air Commandos since the command was established in 1990, with each star carrying the name and date of an AFSOC Airman.

“We will always remember them,” said Jayne Warner, the spiritual community program peer network coordinator with AFSOC POTFF. “We are thankful for them and their service, and for what they did for our country – for AFSOC.”

A four-foot tree with 48 gold stars represents the Airmen who lost their lives in combat. A 7 1/2 foot tree bears 254 red and white stars for active duty Airmen, as well as 63 blue stars for civilians who died while working in an AFSOC position.

“This is a time-honored tradition to honor our 365 Air Commandos that are represented on these trees,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Hill, deputy commander of AFSOC. “We do this every year, as a way to remind ourselves and let the families know, that we have not forgotten our fallen.”

This year, no additional gold stars were hung, but 15 more red, white and blue stars were added by leadership.

The first six stars were placed on the tree by U.S. Air Force Col. Timothy Hood, vice commander of the 1st Special Operations Wing, and U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. John Lang,  superintendent of the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Group.

Hill followed and honored six Airmen by hanging six stars on the tree, representing four Airmen with the 27th Special Operations Wing, Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico; one Airman with the 919th Special Operations Wing, Duke Field, Florida; and one Airman with HQ AFSOC.

Finally, U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, and U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Christopher Grove, command chief of the 24th SOW, added the last three stars.

Both Honor Trees can be seen by visitors to the headquarters building.

“It’s a reminder to all of us, during the holidays, how much we have to be thankful for,” said Hill. “We are grateful for these Air Commandos and their families who served our nation.”

The 15 Airmen who lost their lives in 2020, are:

1st SOW:

Senior Master Sergeant Rick DeMorgan

Airman 1st Class Victor Berastain

Technical Sergeant. Phillip Vos

Senior Airman Edwin Royer

Airman 1st Class Conor Poole

Senior Airman Canaan Johnson

24th SOW:

Mr. Matthew Unsicker

Airman 1st Class Keigan Baker

Staff Sergeant Samuel Marti

27th SOW:

Ms. Roswitha Cantanzaro

Senior Airman Matthew Miller

Ms. Nancy Gilestra

Senior Airman David Saldana

HQ AFSOC:

Technical Sergeant Brian Stephens

Duke Field:

Lieutenant Colonel Hunter Letchman