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745th SOS deactivates

Air Force Special Operations Air Warfare Center Commander Brig. Gen. Jon Weeks and 745th SOS Commander Lt. Col. Rick Seymour officially deactivate the squadron by furling the unit's  colors. The 745th SOS was activated in May 2007 to support AFSOC missions. (U.S. Air Force Photo / Senior Airman Naomi M. Griego)

Air Force Special Operations Air Warfare Center Commander Brig. Gen. Jon Weeks and 745th SOS Commander Lt. Col. Rick Seymour officially deactivate the squadron by furling the unit's colors. The 745th SOS was activated in May 2007 to support AFSOC missions. (U.S. Air Force Photo / Senior Airman Naomi M. Griego)

745th Special Operations Squadron Chief Maser Sgt. Mike Surles bears the unit's colors during a deactivation ceremony at Hurlburt Field, officiated by Air Force Special Operations Air Warfare Center Commander Brig. Gen. Jon Weeks and 745th SOS commander Lt. Col. Rick Seymour. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Senior Airman Naomi M. Griego)

745th Special Operations Squadron Chief Maser Sgt. Mike Surles bears the unit's colors during a deactivation ceremony at Hurlburt Field, officiated by Air Force Special Operations Air Warfare Center Commander Brig. Gen. Jon Weeks and 745th SOS commander Lt. Col. Rick Seymour. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Senior Airman Naomi M. Griego)

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. -- The 745th Special Operations Squadron deactivated Aug. 23 during a ceremony here at the Soundside Club.

Lt. Col. Rick Seymour, 745th SOS commander, presided over the ceremony with more than 200 Airmen and guests in attendance.

The squadron originally stood up in 2007 with the mission to organize, train, equip, and deploy RC-26B aircrew members in direct support of U.S. Special Operations Command objectives.

"Initially, the 745th SOS was developed to solve a short-term, one-year capability gap," Seymour said. "However, that temporary mission eventually turned into a six-year commitment, which is now coming to an end."

During its history, more than 1,000 outstanding Air National Guard citizen soldiers nationwide have either volunteered or deployed with this elite squadron. The accomplishments of these quiet professionals are unprecedented.

"The 745th SOS is one of the most highly decorated squadrons with more than 1,500 combat citations awarded," Seymour said. "We were also awarded the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award on three different occasions."

With just four aircraft, these guardsmen enabled more than 10,000 combat sorties totaling approximately 46,000 combat flying hours during Operations Iraqi Freedom, New Dawn and Enduring Freedom.

The squadron's combat operations were specifically applauded by retired Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal, who served his last assignment on active duty as the International Security Assistance Force commander in Afghanistan.

McChrystal said the 745th SOS is, "...accomplishing extraordinary work, a key component whose impact is immeasurable."